Projects

Halimeda bioherms on the Great Barrier Reef

The calcareous green alga Halimeda is a major contributor to inter-reef carbonate sediments and is found along the northern Great Barrier Reef shelf as extensive build-ups of sediment, called bioherms.

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Crowdsourced bathymetry on the Great Barrier Reef

Crowdsourced bathymetry is the collection of depth measurements from vessels using standard navigation instruments. Many vessels on the Great Barrier Reef - from dive boats to fishing boats - use some type of echo sounder to measure the depth of water. Combined with GPS satellite navigation, these instruments are used for safe navigation and guiding the activities permitted in the zoning maps for the GBR Marine Park.

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Undersea landslides of north-eastern Australia

Undersea, or submarine, landslides are common features on steep continental margins and the sides of oceanic islands around the world. Submarine slope failure is a natural hazard process that dramatically shapes the seafloor environment and transfers large quantities of sediment from the shelf into the deep basins. They can be triggered by different mechanisms and are important to study due to their ability to generate large and catastrophic tsunamis.

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Submarine canyons of north-eastern Australia

Submarine canyons are among the largest undersea landscape features on Earth, and act as pathways for most of the terrigenous and carbonate sediment transported from the continents to the deep-sea. Canyons are typically associated with large submarine fans and gravity flows at their far reaches, showing their importance as conduits for sediment transport. On the north-eastern Australia continental slope, numerous submarine canyons cut into the Great Barrier Reef margin which terminate in the deep troughs and basins bordering the margin.

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Tasmantid Seamounts of Australia

The ocean floor is the Earth’s last great frontier, full of great mountain ranges and deep chasms that are largely unexplored. Just 150-600 km east of the Australian mainland is a 2000 km long chain of submerged volcanoes that rise over 4000 m above the seafloor - nearly twice the height of the highest mountain on the mainland. These undersea mountains, the Tasmantid Seamounts, are extinct volcanoes formed from around 40 to 6 million years ago above a mantle hotspot, similar to the Hawaiian Islands.

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